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ahayo
(@alechayosh07)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
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@abuzz To go further, we have recently discussed that the governess is some sort of insane or crazy. Her mental state isn't always there and that might add to the telling of the story. Because of it being told from her account it's possibly her writings. So if he wasn't always there in her head then she might skip parts or not go over something. Just to be teased as a reader until the end when this theory might make a little sense with Mile's death. 


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Conster
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@alechayosh07

I agree that the mental state of the Governess is correlated to the odd and sometimes confusing text of the book. The interesting thing about the novel being written like this is the subtleness of it as an aspect of the story as you first begin reading the book. The analysis that we have gone into as a class on the psychological aspects of the novel goes to show the effectiveness of James' intentional writing techniques. The storytelling that is written is structurally set up for the context of the novel in a way that furthers the theme in a very significant way.


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abuzz
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@alechayosh07 I think her mental state is a very valid point to discuss. Your reasoning for her skipping around or not making total sense adds to her psychological analysis. We know from the events recounted that she was seeing ghosts, she greatly admired the children constantly, and she praised herself very highly. When you bring up Mile's death at the end here, do you think the death caused her to create a story about her time at Bly--- or maybe not that far but she added to embellish--- or do you think the account is true despite her not remembering things because of time?


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MSAR
 MSAR
(@msar)
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@conster James writing technique also made it so that miles' would be looked at as a creep or some sort of mischievous being. Disregarding the fact that he is supposed to take on a role much more mature for his age. Miles' Psychology is also at play here. He is presented to us like a mess without the reader finding out about his odd situation that he is living in. 


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octavia
(@octavia)
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@msar This is true. James' writing definitely meant to make Miles look like this mysterious kid who was just super shady. It skews the view of the reader and I think there is a lot more psychological analysis that needed to be done on him to really see his struggles and personality. 


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MangoMan
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@leinweber and now being done with the book it's quite interesting to look back on the book and see the definition of protect being thrown around.  We know there was something going on with the governess but now we see the words she used in a different manor. 


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