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Dialogue is Action

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Miles

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abuzz
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@xmysterio I like how you took a more elementary concept and related it to what we have learned in AP Lit. The thought of "protagonist" and "antagonist" takes me back to elementary and middle school, uncovering the most basic sentiments of a story. You have taken this idea and implemented it into psych literary theory, exposing that perhaps we should be identifying the internal struggles of the governess.


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stella
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@xmysterio, I agree, the story being told solely from her perspective sets up the audience to believe that she is the protagonist. In most stories, the one who tells it is usually the good one, the one that the audience is supposed to root for. When I started to read this novel I immediately assumed that the governess was sort of a hero, though as I continued to read my view of her changed. 


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xmysterio
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@stella Setting up the character as a protagonist shifts the reader’s view of the character. However there are some instances where the protagonist is set up to be the villain and we still root for them. For instance, the Loki show coming out on Disney Plus sets Loki up as a villain and is about him. But I’m sure the audience will still root for him once it comes out, because that character is loved. The governess, however... she’s not that loved by the audience. 


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xmysterio
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@abuzz Yes thank you. Although that wasn’t what I was trying to do, it still fits that purpose successfully. I was simplifying the complex internal struggles of the governess into what we’ve previously been raised learning about in elementary school like you said.


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xmysterio
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@delphine Yes exactly. Miles and the governess could both be antagonists to each other, or they could both be protagonists. Or just one or the other. 


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stella
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@xmysterio, good point! It is interesting how we perceive different characters, I think the reason that the governess and Loki are seen differently is because of their differing traits. While both are morally reprehensible at times, Loki is seen as fun-loving and mischievous. On the other hand, the governess is seen as overly-ambitious and too self-confident for her own good.


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stella
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@delphine, I agree I think that this book is so interesting because there is no clear protagonist. Depending on your interpretation of the story the governess can either be the hero or the villain. 


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