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The Groundhog

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Carla Tortelli
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@madams43 I love your thinking! I have the same views on the concept. The way you phrased those questions made me want to start writing a vivid interpretation of what death might be like. I appreciate you putting those thoughts out, they are very neat and interesting to read on. The questions you pose definitely get you into that realm of deeper thought. Even the first question "how would it feel to vanish forever?" I feel like many would just think of a void, then slowly coming up with what they feel may fit the prompt. Anyhow you really put these thoughts into a small text box very well and I enjoyed reading all of it!


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Madams43
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@carlatortelli

Thank you so much! I'm not the best when it comes to putting my thoughts into words that others can easily understand but I can talk about things like this for hours! If you do decide to write that interpretation I'd love to read it! 


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Madams43
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@alechayosh07

Im sorry I don't always come across very clear. What I was trying to get across in using the word "marvelous" is that children see things that we don't think twice about in a pure, fresh, innocent way thus "renewing" life. The scratches on the floor or water in a bathtub or a lake are all things that (once we mature and begin to view things in terms of survival and profit) we don't see beauty or magic in anymore. But in the eyes of a child, they are marvelous and beautiful and full of magic because they're new. Because life is renewed. 


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Madams43
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@alechayosh07

What I meant by the idea of "passing a torch" was that once the time comes for you to die, you pass a legacy or "the torch of life" on to your children, allowing 'you' to survive in another way. But I do like your take on it as well. The Idea to do something big and meaningful in my life has always haunted me too. Until I learned that the real meaning of life is just to be alive. It's that simple and yet everyone runs around with that same fear that it's essential for them to achieve something greater than themselves. 

That's not to say that you can't or shouldn't or won't do extraordinary things with your life. It just means that you should feel no worry or panic to do so because simply being alive is what there is to life. 


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Madams43
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@bunkymoo

That is kind of what I meant by using the word "marvelous". The way that new things are beautiful to a child is the way life begins its game again. It wouldn't get to do that if you lived forever. 

Also, It's normal for all of us to wonder if we're heading down the right path and making the right decisions for our futures, but don't let that consume you. If you're always worried and in a panic over the future, you're not enjoying your present. 


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Madams43
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@mangoman

Absolutely, there's no need to fear death in my opinion. The fear surrounding it, as I mentioned before, comes from our unreasonable idea that we will be experiencing everlasting non-existence (which isn't even a possible experience). 


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wildsalmon
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@madams43 That's an interesting idea, how you can't ever really experience non-existence. I imagine most people envision death as an endless black void, but really thinking about it, it can't be that way. The fear really stems from that unknown, since it's impossible to imagine not existing. It's like trying to imagine a new color, it's just something we can't percieve. Unknowable is so much scarier than unknown, I suppose.


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bunkymoo
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@salmon exactly what I was thinking. We are scared of the unknown, and what might come after that point. People can believe in different things, but we all share that common theme of this unknown that can't be explained, because no one is around to explain it. When I think of this topic, I think back to when we read flatland, and how the unknown was something forbidden in their world. I think that this idea is very interesting.


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xwing37
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@salmon, I agree, I think if people were to know for sure what happens after death it would make it less scary. But everyone has different beliefs about what actually happens. I think it would make death much less scary if people knew for sure that it was a black void or if it was something else. I think the idea of unknown or unknowable is super interesting. I couldn't really imagine what happens after death actually becoming known so that's the scary part. I feel like it's the one thing that technology can't let us take control of.


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MangoMan
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@xwing37 while I agree closure would be nice to have about how our stories end, what is the point of knowing?  If people knew we all are born to die and become worm food then why would some people strive to be the best versions of themselves?  I feel like especially people who believe in a higher power would not want to know and rather live by their morals.


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aplitstudent123
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@mangoman I agree that I cannot see a huge benefit to knowing what comes after death. I think while the idea of not knowing can be frightening at times, it is the thing that pushes us to make our life great while we have the chance because we only know for sure that we get one shot at it. I also think that people who believe in a higher power would be harmed because if their beliefs turned out to be wrong, this could be very unsettling and harm their morals like you mentioned.


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xwing37
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@mangoman, I personally feel like the idea of knowing is for closure. I feel like a majority of people just want to know what's going to happen. But I also think that everyone should just live their lives like they don't know what's going to happen after they die. If people knew that something good could potentially come after death they might not live their lives how they are meant to be. I feel like the unknown aspect of death pushes people to live their lives the best they can.


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Madams43
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@xwing37

I agree with this actually. If you know what it's going to all come to after you die, then what's the point? It modifies the way you live your life, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. But knowing what happens after you die only causes everyone to run around worried about everything they're doing. They're not really living at that point. 


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Carla Tortelli
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@xwing37 I like your overall take on the subject! I feel like not many like to settle in face of the unknown factor, and like you said that may impact their everyday life depending on how frequently they think about it. I feel like only a small bit of people don't think of it at all. Most people will question what death is all about but to the degree they take that discussion, allows us to observe how it may effect their everyday living. Yea if everyone knew that whatever happens after is good or bad will highly effect how everyone were to live their lives. I like your thoughts on this topic! 


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wildsalmon
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@madams43 That's an interesting take, how you're not really living if you're only focused on the end. It reminds me of the saying "it's not about the destination, it's about the journey." Except in this instance, the destination isn't at all real and it's more like driving down a road until your car breaks down. I'd always thought of the unknowability of death as a scary and somewhat bad thing, but honestly this has skewed my perspective a little.


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