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Dialogue is Action

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Carla Tortelli
(@carlatortelli)
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@msar I agree with you! They had very different views but appreciated how both took a look at the concept of boundaries. I didn't see the neighbor as harsh nor the speaker as pushy. They came to a sort of census of sorts. It very well demonstrated how there can be multiple valid points of view in one debate in a sense. I really enjoyed how Frost was able to outline each side without being aggressive.


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stella
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@carlatortelli, I think the style of the poem is what made this point clear to me. It never seems to take a side on whether either person is "right" or "wrong." As you mentioned, it is very casual. I think this helped me to realize that neither person's point of view was wrong. Setting boundaries doesn't have to be a bad thing, but the way the poem presents it isn't always easy. 


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xmysterio
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@carlatortelli Yes! I love your interpretation of their views. I always knew that their views, although differing, were for the same purpose: substantially maintaining a good relationship with one another. However, your take on how both neighbors intend to do that is very compelling. The speaker prefers to stay close, while the neighbor prefers to maintain boundaries.


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wildsalmon
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@carlatortelli While I like your unique perspective on this, I disagree and think you went too far in the opposite direction. They didn't necessarily agree, they simply stopped talking about it because they knew neither would change their mind. While, yes, it presents neither character as "wrong," it also intentionally places us in the role of the speaker, who gives pretty clear thoughts on the neighbor's viewpoint. It's a bit more complex than either "differing opinions can exist" or "boundaries are bad," I think.


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MSAR
 MSAR
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@carlatortelli yes thanks for understanding. Now about the aggression point you brought up. I do believe that there was some sort of passive-aggression action going on there. One can sense it with the slight tone change in the story. I least I thought so, let me know if I am crazy XD.


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xwing37
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@msar, I noticed that too. I felt like there was constant tension between the neighbor and the narrator. I didn't know if I was the only person who thought this because I haven't seen many forums on it. But I believe there was some passive aggression because they were both thinking different things about each other. The neighbor probably was wondering why the narrator wanted a fence and the narrator thought vice versa. But that's a good observation you brought up.


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aplitstudent123
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@xwing37 I felt some tension between the neighbor and the speaker as well. I think this is something the author used to allow readers to detect the fact that these two were in disagreement about something. I read through this twice and on the first time I noticed this, so the next time I read I felt that I understood more thoroughly what was going on. The tension wasn't necessary a bad thing in my point of view, rather it was a piece added to the mood so that reader's understandings could be strengthened.


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MSAR
 MSAR
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@xwing37 Or we could all be wrong and be interpreting what we call 'Passive-aggression' might've been considered a mutual agreement for all we know. But as we see it knowadays that is looked at as passive aggression.


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octavia
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@msar I definitely see the passive-aggression there. I felt something was off but couldn't  pinpoint it, and I just realized this was what was setting the weird mood. It was for sure there when they talk about the fence, and I think it's essential to have that tone so the readers understand what's really going on between them.


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bunkymoo
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@carlatortelli Talking about boundaries is very important, and bringing it up subtly in a poem was cool in my opinion. It seemed like they both agreed, but the narrator was just confused on why there were boundaries. It can be a difficult subject, but I think this poem shines light on that if you make boundaries in your life, it can help prevent that conflict that may be occuring, just like it did with the narrator and the neighbor.


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