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Icarus  

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xwing37
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@bunkymoo, I agree, this is one of the first poems that I've been able to comprehend pretty well. It was engaging to me as well so I really enjoyed it. With a mix of being able to understand it and wanting to read more of the poem made helped me really enjoy the workshop. But this one and The Groundhog are definitely my favorite. They both have a meaning that is easier for a audience connect to then the other poems we have read.


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ahayo
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@xwing37 I can agree with both of you. I have a little knowledge prior to this poem, but I don't usually do well with poems and this was one that I can for sure talk about without stuttering or not having a comment about. I believe that this is the case because of the setting in the poem. This was the closest thing that I have read in poetry that was near our time period. It made me not only understand the poem but relate to how Icarus was feeling and why he felt as he did. And I feel that goes for your groundhog comment as well, they were just simple poems that had deeper meaning if you wished to dive into those meanings.


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ahayo
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@stella Though it is sad to see "Icarus" without being brave or excited in the new world, do you think that if he was in his world he would be any happier? I'm going to try and compare this to moving. When I was younger maybe 4th grade I had to move school districts. This causing me to lose all my friends, and leave a place I thought was going to be my home forever. Change is difficult and takes a large amount of time for some people to get back on their feet. I find this to be true with Icarus. He is thrown into a new world where he knows nothing. All he knows is that it is foreign and wants out, which is where his death thoughts come from. I just find that these two things relate and if he could go back would anything be different?


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Jackson Von Habsburg
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Icarus is a poem which is discussing the monotony of modern life and one mans attempt to break free from that so the prison which is discussed in the original poem is a prison that is physically a prison. In the poem, the prison that exists in the modern interpretation of the poem is metaphysically a prison which the narrator is in which is his own life. He wants to break free from the modern world which traps him in. I think that in the poem the narrator creating the wings is a metaphor for his new ideas which the modern world wants to keep trapped. so the whole point of the poem is about new ideas and people trying to break free from society. 

 


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MangoMan
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@jacksonvon Different than what I originally said but I agree with you as well on this.  I agree that yes this is a story that shares ideas and shows us the point of of view of someone who wants to be free.  But do we know why he wants to be free? I say yes, I think like I've said in other forum posts that being free is a natural desire and in this case Icarus was craving it to the point that it consumed him and he lost that freedom.


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stella
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@alechayosh07, I think this is a really interesting question. In the poem's context, I saw Icarus's surroundings and himself as reflections of one another. So it's hard to say whether a change in scenery would improve his conditions or if that too would begin to reflect his depressed state. Overall, I think Icarus is more affected by his failure than his surroundings, so I don't think him being in a familiar area would change him that much. 


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Carla Tortelli
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This week I found an interesting poem that took a different perspective on Icarus' fall. (the file should be attached. If not, this poem from what I know does not have a title so you can just search up Here's what they don't tell you: Icarus laughed when he fell) This poem given no title, posted with only the name Fiona, rewrites Icarus. When I read this all I could think about was the poem we looked at. I thought it was an interesting take that we could, in some ways connect to our original poem. This poem focuses more on this fall, rather then his life after. This poem almost makes us re-examine our conceptions on the tale and view it in a different light, and questions our portrayal of tragedy. Rather than viewing those central to tragedy as victims, it gives them the power to embrace their disaster and laugh even as they fall in a sense. 


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bunkymoo
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@mangoman I don't know or remember exactly why Icarus wants to be free, and it isn't what I focused on while reading the poem. But I agree with you, whatever he wanted to be free from, he became free, but abused that freedom, ultimately resulting in his failure. But why risk the freedom that you have if you know it can bring you consequences? Why not listen to those who tell you not to do something?


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ahayo
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@bunkymoo well there are a couple of observations on why he wants to be free. For one if you look at the original myth him and his father are trapped in prison on and island and they can't stand the isolation, hence why they build wings to fly away. But I'm sure we are all aware of the myth so let me give my observation on the poem aspect. In the "normal" life he was living I feel as though the narrator might've been unhappy because of them not having anyone. This idea is a little farfetched but there is no mention of family or happiness and I feel that might be the case. Him not listening was just him being a child in the original myth. We have all had those moments where our parents tell us not to do something and we end up doing it anyways. Sometimes the consequences are worse then others. And in this story they are near death, and death.


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xwing37
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@alechayosh07, I didn't really think of him just being a kid and not listening to his parents, because he's obviously very powerful. But this is very true, he did what every kid has done in their life and like you said his consequences were much worse then just getting yelled at. I think this is a big point that you brought up and it's also interesting to think that he did something that a normal kid would do and now he is sentenced to a normal life in the normal world. But I really agree with the point you brought up and it definitely made me think.


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aplitstudent123
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@alechayosh07 I like your idea of not listening to your parents. I also thought of his problem as being more of a reckless thing, where he had less regard for his life than he should have, and that he was greedy. Yes, he was told to not fly too close to the sun, but at the end of the day the only person who could control his actions of greed and recklessness was himself. Although extreme, his punishment for this was not so simple as dying. Rather, he had to live a life in which he was doomed to a life without meaning. Because he didn't value his wings, and the life he had like he should've, it was taken away from him and he was forced to live in a life that he didn't like and could not appreciate.


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Carla Tortelli
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@jacksonvon I really like your take on this poem. So the big picture would encapture those who want to sort of break free from societies grip. With this we can take away that society in this image is sort of black and white. Even with the tone of this poem I didn't imagine it to be in color I imagined the whole thing in black and white. We see that society is not fitting for Icarus at all. He wants to break away and become who he used to be, but this new society is beating him down to stay the way he is. Overall I really enjoyed your outlook on this poem! 


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Carla Tortelli
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@xmysterio I really liked how you focused on that sun moment. It was mentioned for only a moment and I liked how you made that connection. The fact that, that mention alone could reflect back to the reader was very interesting. We see that this poem contains many concepts that can relate back to each individual reader, yet this one never seemed to cross my mind. I guess we have all felt like Icarus one way or another at least once in our lives.


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stella
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@aplitstudent123, I agree with you that Icarus would be better living in ignorance than suffering from the knowledge that he has. I see it as he could experience joy for a short time by experiencing the world and then spend the rest of his life in misery or live a somewhat happy life as a normal person. I feel like people tend to think the opposite as many people value experience and adventure and look down on average life. Personally, I don't see anything wrong with living an average life. 


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stella
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@abuzz, I think this is a really interesting perspective. I had never considered that Icarus's point of view would influence the story. I think that it is possible that the neighbors could be miserable, especially with the way that Icarus's neighborhood is described. I also think that Icarus feels sorry for himself, so he sees everyone else as living a better life than without considering the details. 


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