Forums

Dialogue is Action

Last Post Update:  January 16

Post Credits:

  • 3+ Weeks of Credit: xwing37, Nicole, Carla Tortelli, Persephone
  • 2 Weeks of Credit: ---
  • 1 Week of Credit:  abuzz,  aplitstudent123. MangoMan

Posts during the midterm week will count as extra credit on whichever semester they impact most.

Notifications
Clear all

Icarus  

Page 2 / 5

klynnph
(@klynnph)
Disciple AP Lit 2021
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 44
 

Greek Myth is something I've always loved! (I even have a full book on all Greek Gods/Goddess as well as all the myths). This impromptu was really fun for me, I really enjoyed reading and analyzing Fields version of this myth. I love how he brought Icarus back to life and threw him into a modern setting. 


ReplyQuote
bunkymoo
(@bunkymoo)
Gnome AP Lit 2021
Topics
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 97
 

@klynnph I agree. This myth is very interesting, even more so with the plot twist that Fields gave to it. It was interesting to see Icarus's life portrayed after his "death", and how he felt about the situation he was in. I believe that it was a fairly easy poem to follow, and it wasn't super confusing to me like some other poems I have read. Analyzing the poem and finding literary devices made me super focused on tiny details, and made the poem a lot better in my opinion. Even though I still find poems difficult, they are getting easier and more enjoyable over time, just like this one!


ReplyQuote
xwing37
(@xwing37)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 148
 

@savhoisington, what I said could also connect to what you said. While I said that society punishes you for taking risks instead of taking the route that you are "supposed" to take in life, it could also punish you because it doesn't understand why you took those risks. I guess that makes it more complex in a way, but I also think this is a interesting meaning of the poem. I also think it's true to this day, some people who are going to go to college might not understand why another person would want to take the risk of being a entrepreneur. And they might criticize them for it, and I think criticism and doubt is something that is always going to come when you take a risk. People aren't always supportive of you, this could be when you're taking a risk as small as jumping into the pool for the first time, or as big as dropping out of college to pursue your dream of making a business. But I think it's really interesting how everyone has their own interpretation of the poem.    


ReplyQuote
octavia
(@octavia)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 101
 

@klynnph I agree with this! I also love Greek mythology, so having something I was familiar with made it easier not only to write the impromptu, but also grade others writing because I knew what I was looking for. The poem felt a lot easier to look for devices in and really understand the main ideas because of my interest and previous knowledge. But also overall, these poems are getting slowly easier to analyze, which is great!


ReplyQuote
aplitstudent123
(@aplitstudent123)
Bookworm
Topics
Posts
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 106
 

@bunkymoo I agree that poems have been getting easier to analyze as we practice them more! I really enjoyed how this poem because of how it was based off of a Greek Myth that I was somewhat familiar with (and it also gave a small description of it). I liked this type of poem because I went into it with background knowledge and an understanding of what it was talking about. Sometimes when I read other poems, I don't quite understand what is going on until I get all the way through it. Also, like you said, analyzing the piece for textual evidence also really helped me deepen my understanding of the piece.


ReplyQuote
ahayo
(@alechayosh07)
Gnome AP Lit 2021
Topics
Member
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 93
 

I'm glad we got to read this poem, I have always liked the myth of Icarus and for it to be implemented into a piece of literature with a whole different meaning was really cool to me. Coming into reading this I had no clue what to really expect, I saw the title "Icarus" and just figured it was going to be about the myth but was very surprised to see the twist the author provided. The main idea of the poem in my head is that the modern life is portrayed as boring and anyone of Icarus's kind (a god) would find it unbearable and uneventful. This providing the authors internal conflict with the life he lives and wanting more. 


ReplyQuote
Carla Tortelli
(@carlatortelli)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 104
Topic starter  

@theboulder I really like your take on the overall tone and imagery! The imagery in this piece directly effects the tone depicted to the reader. I have to say I did imagine a somewhat of a grey reality he was thrown into. We really see this world through Incarus' eyes, and his only. We pull this feeling from the imagery, as you pointed out. Some of the words add to that feeling, words such as defeated or sad give us that rainy day feel. We see that the overall feel in this world he is thrown into is sad because he himself feels he doesn't belong. He flew without thought of a punishment, in his eyes he would never fail or drown in a sense. When he did he was thrown into this bleak reality, in his eyes, where he could no longer be who he thought to be himself.


ReplyQuote
Carla Tortelli
(@carlatortelli)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 104
Topic starter  

@alechayosh07 I've always been interested in Greek Mythology, but never had time to get into the stories. Reading this was really cool. Seeing how field sort of adapted this story into a more modern setting was very interesting. How he used imagery and tone to address the setting really allowed us to feel how Icarus did. This new reality that he was thrown into was not to his liking, and expressed that in various ways. Its really nice to see how one takes a myth like this and turn it over as he did. The devices and tactics used where great in aiding the readers overall understanding. 


ReplyQuote
Carla Tortelli
(@carlatortelli)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 104
Topic starter  

@klynnph This was actually a pretty fun impromptu! I feel like I could really imagine the whole poem in my head. With the imagery and tone it was really easy to see right through Icarus. It was very easy to follow unlike some original Greek myths. I could clearly imagine the world he hated. I imagined it as a sort of after a nuclear war world, no one for miles, ash and rubble on the ground before him. That's what I got seeing how Icarus might feel in this new reality. The diction field used helped me to further understand the overall emotion of Icarus and the setting he portrayed through his eyes. I got the nuclear aftermath feeling because of how Icarus was feeling, that obviously was not the reality he was living in. He lived in a normal society with no Gods and only humans for miles, of course this God did not feel himself.


ReplyQuote
Carla Tortelli
(@carlatortelli)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 104
Topic starter  

@msar If we look closely we can see that Icarus could actually be a symbol of the modern human being as he goes through multiple failures in his life that strip him of his original spark of ambition. I feel like with this modern twist readers are further able to relate to Icarus and his reaction to his failures. Every person starts life believing that they can be successful, just like Icarus in the myth believed he could fly high and close to the sun. Just as the sun ruined his wings, failures are something that very much drag our beliefs that we are special and different. Multiple disappointments make us bitter in relation to a normal life where the society around us kills our original ambition. Like Icarus we wished we would have "drowned" trying to succeed instead of burning out due to our failures and looks of our society.


ReplyQuote
Carla Tortelli
(@carlatortelli)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 104
Topic starter  

@savhoisington I love your thought process around this poem! The devices used in this poem very well adapt this myth to a contemporary setting. Just as you said these devices are very clear and easy to understand, but allow room for complex thinking as well. We can almost feel the pain Icarus is feeling in this poem. We see how hard it is living in a society that knows nothing of your achievements and only judges you on your past failures. All these devices put us in the same mood as Icarus in this new reality he has landed himself in. Overall we really do encapsulate how Icarus is feeling in this society solely made up of humans. This society has a new mindset that is detrimental to Icarus in this poem, and he ends up losing his sense of self in a way. 


ReplyQuote
MangoMan
(@mangoman)
Gnome AP Lit 2021
Topics
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 96
 

Icarus, a story I find to have multiple meanings.  On one hand we have the classic "don't take what you have for granted", and then we have the other side of the story which is after Icarus loses his wings.  I believe this other theme is to learn to live in the shoes of the average person.  What do you think?


ReplyQuote
Carla Tortelli
(@carlatortelli)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 104
Topic starter  

@mangoman I don't really know if we can say that is an overall theme. "To learn to live in the shoes of the average person." Why does one have to learn this? what is considered "average" these are some concepts we need to consider when bringing up that idea. Does everyone in todays world/reality have to walk in the shoes of an "average" person before they die. The thing that is just not setting with me is the thought of what an "average" person is made of? In order for this to be one of the main factors of this poem there are some gaps that may need some explaining. For Icarus being a God was average, so what is living as a human for him?


ReplyQuote
a2m0e0m2
(@a2m0n2)
Gnome AP Lit 2021
Topics
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 76
 

@msar I see where you're coming from. It starts as such a depressing piece of literature, as he has lost everything he had worked so hard for. It's quite a sad story on how different his life could've been if he would've succeeded in his goal, but the character he became after his failure isn't much of a character that one could look up to. 


ReplyQuote
a2m0e0m2
(@a2m0n2)
Gnome AP Lit 2021
Topics
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 76
 

@klynnph I agree! I think it might've been one of my favorite impromptus to date. I was really into greek mythology as a kid so I already knew about this story. It was nice being able to connect my past knowledge of the topic to an impromptu that I might've not done as good if I wouldn't have known that information. 


ReplyQuote
Page 2 / 5
Share:

Forum Reminders:

  • Only Substantive Posts earn credit.
  • Five posts/week earn 100% for that week.
  • Deadlines are Fridays at 11:59 pm.
  • Any single week can earn up to 150%:
    • Six posts = 120%
    • Seven posts = 140%
    • Eight posts = 150%
    • Nine posts = 150%, etc.
  • One successful podcast replaces 5 posts.

Substantive Posts:

  • Are usually several thoughtful sentences in length:
    • Demonstrate that reading was done or a concept is understood
      • Might quote text
    • Express a thoughtful idea about that concept/reading
    • May be questions, but if so, also speculations
  • Are constructive and productive to the discussion
  • Are supportive of other members and their ideas
  • May/should challenge/provoke/take risks in thinking