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The Second Bakery Attack

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MSAR
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@theboulder nice catch! I never noticed that. That adds a very unusual second layer of storytelling into the mix. I can't think what it does for the greater picture of the story, I mean maybe it meant that things went well and a breaking out of social norm once in a while is definitely healthy to keep a stable and successful relationship as long as they did.


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MSAR
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@nikki yes the lack of character development is what knocked me off my feet when I first read it. I thought that because Murakami was heavily influenced (or at least liked including) western items in his stories that it would be a simple read just like any other short western story with its happy resolution. But going back to what @theboulder said, Murakami is telling the story of a story insinuating that his marriage went well giving us a very indirect resolution that we as a western audience are not used to. Pretty interesting way of writing a story.


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Jackson Von Habsburg
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I never saw the hunger is like a physical hunger. I saw his kind of a more spiritual emotional kind of hunger.  Amazon website Monday afternoon live would cause a lot of the issues why they're so upset with their own surroundings and I think that hunger is more of a hunger for conflict and kind of this human desire which could be some kind of a more natural desire for humans to play with each other. I just some of the humans do and I think that is lost in the modern world and you know I see there is not a bad or good thing I think it's just natural that he was going to fight each other. it's just something that happens because they really do need a thorough they just sit there and they they do the jobs there it's like what is what for them to do you know that kind of reaction that such a breakout way. I feel like that's what happens to a lot of people in our own society and I don't like it just snap because they don't have an outlet for that need for conflict. Because we all see it as such a toxic thing that needs to be getting rid got rid of and I think that's a problem. And I don't really think that was super toxic because just a thing that all humans need to to a. I think conflict is released within our nature And that's why I think it's at the heart of the story. Is discontent for living in rotten Society in that need for conflict


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xmysterio
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@nikki Yes you are right. The narrator seems to almost be downplaying these significant events. I thought it was to take the blame off of these characters, but perhaps there’s another reason? I’m not sure what to make of it. 


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xmysterio
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@stella We can’t blame society in this case. It’s not society’s fault that these specific individuals felt entrapped, and that they wanted a way out. I would blame the characters before blaming society. They know societal restrictions and how it operates, it’s their choice to go against it. I may want to run away and commit crimes one day, but I know that in society that is considered wrong so I won’t be doing that. If I did, I would be at fault for it.


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stella
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@xmysterio, do you believe that society's values are always right? I agree that what the characters did was wrong, but I can't blame them for feeling out of place in society. I feel like you might be a little more accepting of these characters if they handled their feelings about everyday life's monotony in a better way, one that didn't involve violence. 


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Delphine
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@xmysterio Yes, they know, but what if the restrictions are unjust or flat out wrong? Shouldn't we utilize our abilities and stand up for what's right and what we believe in, even if it may go against the law?


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xmysterio
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@delphine In that case I suppose you’re right. But with the food industry, the restrictions don’t call for reckless behavior like that. I feel that in order to play out your example there would need to be a more extreme fight for their rights.


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Nikki
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@xmysterio This could be an explanation. Do you think this would be to make the characters more likeable/relatable? Or is there another reason you're thinking of? In my opinion, the actions aren't downplayed as much as relayed with a nonchalant tone. I think maybe this could be to stir the reader.


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Nikki
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@msar This is so interesting! The way that Murakami chose to write this just raises more questions from the reader. These are questions that we may not get to know the answers to. As a reader from the western world things seem very off.


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xmysterio
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@nikki Yes that's true. I think perhaps the downplay of their actions by the narrator results in a more protagonistic impact on the reader. Having their actions depicted as more nonchalant results the reader finding these characters more relatable or more worthy of being in favor of them. So yes you are right about that. 


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MSAR
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@nikki May I add that these questions that get brought up by the piece of literature often lead to inconclusive paths that in a way behave like answers. They are in a way as meaningful as answers because of the way we have to wrap our heads around it to accept them.


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Nikki
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@msar interesting and true take! How do you think the value of these questions compares to the value of "actual" conclusions? I think that they are more valuable because they can lead to a deeper conclusion


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Nikki
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@xmysterio definitely true! I think that the tone of the piece puts the reader at quite an interesting point of view. It has a huge impact on the view of the characters!


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