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Kafka on the Shore and Sexual Themes

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Nicole
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**SPOILERS FROM CHAPTER 21**

Okay so regarding the discussion about how weird it was that he thought Sakura might be his sister, and then proceeded to think about her sexually, when you get to chapter 21, I guess it kind of makes sense that he did that? Not that it makes it any less weird, but there is at least an explanation. He had known for several years that he would one day sleep with his sister, so when he thought about his potential sister like that, he probably wasn't as phased as most of us would be. It's like our conversation in class yesterday, if he knows his fate, is he any more or less responsible for what he does? And like we talked about last week, if he doesn't act on anything, is he responsible for these thoughts? Is responsible for the thoughts since he is fated to sleep with his sister? It seems like he just kind of accepted his fate to sleep with his mother and sister, so he didn't fight the thoughts. And (spoiler from chapter (I think) 25) when he comes to the conclusion that Miss Saeki might be his mother and that he is in love with her, or at least 15-year-old her, he doesn't fight that either. He actually embraces it. Now I don't think the fact that it is his fate makes it ANY LESS weird. It's still pretty creepy to think of your sister that way, but it at least offers an explanation I think. And like I said before, if it is his fate, how responsible is he in what he thinks/does? I don't think there will be an answer that will satisfy us completely, but I think that is an important question to keep in mind for a lot of this novel.


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xwing37
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@savhoisington, this is a really interesting way to think about it. I was confused also when the book was contradicting to what Chisnell said in class. But this makes the most sense for why Kafka is the way he is. If someone follows a culture like Kafka does, you are pretty much bound to pick up some of the habits and language that that culture does. I don't think anything massive would change in you but subtle things like your thoughts will change. And this is most likely what is happening to Kafka.


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SnowyYeti
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@username27 I think that him being so observant is part of how the book is written.  We as the readers are literally inside of his head.  We hear and see everything that he does and we read every thought he has no matter how weird it is.  That is something that I really like about this book and its something I have never experienced.  I think that everyone is as observant as kafka but we don't say everything we observe.  


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Jackson Von Habsburg
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reading further in the novel it seems it is a lot about Kafka´s coming into a man in this very stand time which would come into his own manhood and come into his own person. I find his character very interesting and I am excited to go and read a lot more about this own. of course, he is a very confused teenager and he does a lot of actions that are bad but still a very interesting character.


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Gil
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In class last week, we discussed Ms. Saeki and Kafka having sex and it was questioned why this scene was so offputting. At the time I hadn't read it so I didn't have anything to add, but now I have many thoughts about it! It was discussed that this chapter was so unsettling because of the age difference and the possibility that Ms. Saeki could be his mother. While I did find these to add to the troubling nature of the scene, I think what really creeped me out about their sex was how Kafka described Ms. Saeki to be asleep, like she wasn't really present. It honestly made me more sad than disturbed. Ms. Saeki was going through the motions, but she was really just disconnected. This scene felt full of sorrow and disconnect and I couldn't help but feel sorry for Ms. Saeki. What were your thoughts about this scene?

Also, I don't understand Kafka's immediate and complete obsession with this women, do you guys? They seem to have many crazy connections, but I still think the two of them together is very strange. He keeps telling everyone that he is in love, but he seems to have decided that very quickly.


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