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First Impressions Of Kafka on the Shore

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savhoisington
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@theboulder while it is obvious, I never pieced two and two together like when you say

Posted by: @theboulder

He only likes libraries and gyms, places where people leave other people alone.

Solitude is a huge part of the book so far, andhe does seem to gravitate towards these things. But something that is also interesting is that his tendencies seem to gravitate towards wanting to be more social in a way. He has some kind of mechanism that The Boy Named Crow is to talk to himself, he spends a lot of his thought thinking about his sister or other people in general, and he seems generally happy after meeting a nice person. Not to mention, he occasionally gets worried that he is away from home and the fact that he is a 15 year old (rightfully so) but my point is that he doesn't seem to have been 100% mentally ready for solitude like I think he tries to be. I wonder how much of him liking solitude is due to how much he had to cope with solitude growing up


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savhoisington
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@nicole I agree that there is definitely a connection between Kafka and Nakata. There has been a lot of signs, such as Nakata's dim/ missing shadow, and then (I can't remember what chapter) Kafka wakes up thinking something along the lines that his shadow looked 'extra long'. I don't know what exactly that could mean, but i definitely do not think it was unintentional. At some point I think that we will learn more/ get more references to shadows. But, I forgot about the reference to the legend of three types of people. This, I think, is going to be really important, because it highlights the idea that a shadow can have a missing half


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xwing37
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@abuzz, I agree, I felt like this book has really pulled me in. I feel like the chapter style is super unique and really interesting to follow. I feel like we get to read multiple different stories at once but it's not too confusing like you said. I feel like at some point in the book all the stories will come together as one and connect. I am also very interested with Nakata's ability to talk to cats.


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stella
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@aplitstudent123 is a good idea, especially considering that Kafka is only 15, although he acts much older than he is. Kafka is very independent and seemingly capable of living almost completely alone, but in moments of self-doubt, the Crow appears, almost like a father reassuring and helping his son. It makes sense that a boy devoid of a parent would create a character to guide him in his life. 


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stella
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@aplitstudent123 that is a good idea, especially considering that Kafka is only 15, although he acts much older than he is. Kafka is very independent and seemingly capable of living almost completely alone, but in moments of self-doubt, the Crow appears, almost like a father reassuring and helping his son. It makes sense that a boy devoid of a parent would create a character to guide him in his life. 


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TheBoulder
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@aplitstudent123 I think Crow appears less because Kafka starts to make new friends, the girl he meets on the bus and Oshima at the library. I have read pretty far into the book and Crow still hasn't returned since the first couple chapters. At this point, I don't know if he will.


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stella
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@theboulder, this is a good idea. The Crow acts sort of a companion to a lonely kid. So, when Kafka begins to meet new people, he doesn't need the Crow as much. As Oshima becomes closer to Kafka, Kafka begins to look up to and depend on him, eliminating Kafka's need for the Crow. 


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MangoMan
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@theboulder Perhaps the crow was a symbol of an imaginary friend materialized.  As Kafka meets new people and gains companionship, the need for a crow that can't give the same emotional connection as a person can fades into a memory.


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Madams43
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@abuzz

I totally agree! I really like how the chapters are laid out and the overall structure of the book. It makes it a lot easier for me to follow the separate storylines. Speaking of which, I love when books have separate storylines that come together at a certain point. I think it makes the book into so much more of a page-turner and so much more interesting. I really like the seriousness of the interview sections as well, I can almost hear them talking and the tone of their voices it's kinda scary. 


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abuzz
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@xwing37 I like your take! I'm not exactly sure how they will connect, possibly they will come to the same realization or uncover a similar meaning in something. It does seem inevitable/purposeful that the two stories will come together and leave with a similarity of sorts. I don't feel like they will ever meet, though. Just seems like an obvious guess. I could be wrong!


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abuzz
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@madams43 I think this is the first book that I have read that has had two back-and-forth storylines. I hope there are more interview/letter chapters. It seems that Murakami does this often, like how the short story "A Window" opened with the critique letter. For me, it makes the story more personal, like you said about hearing their voices. I feel like I'm the one interviewing or receiving the letters.


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Madams43
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@abuzz

I totally agree. It makes the story so much more personal. It also makes for a more interesting plot and in my opinion makes you want to keep reading to see how the storylines connect. 


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Jackson Von Habsburg
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I might be really excited to read this book, at least read more of it that I already have. I really do like the writing style. I feel like I'm going to really connect to the characters so honestly I have some really high bars for the rest of the novel. Like I said we're not even in like that far to the novel and it's already really gripping. These are really good parts of the story so you know it really is something that is attracting me to it. I really do like the dual person narrative.  I'm very interested to learn how this concept will Progressive the story goes along and how each different story will connect so honestly it is very exciting for me. One thing I do like another novel is it definitely feels very personal and that is a plus because I really can feel like . I don't want to spoil too much in this original post because yours is about first impressions, so just leave it at that anyway. I hope you guys have  as much fun as I am reading this. 


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MSAR
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I am not too far into the book yet but it has already caught my eye. The very openess Murakami gives us into his mind is mindblowing to say the least I have never read a book that gives us insight into every single little conflict going on inside a characters mind especially one that paints the main character in a bad light. I also can't wait to  see how the story of the Elementary teacher and Kafka meet up. There is very few similarities I notice like they both are very unknowing characters. I mean this in a way that they don't know what is going on in their lives at the moment lost and confused yet they both have a goal and destination.


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MSAR
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@theboulder Maybe the aspect of Kafka's mind that Crow belongs to just isn't used as much anymore with human interaction. Or its restricted upon human and societal interactions. I am guessing that Crow is part of his Id part of his psyche. It's just his natural instinct and of course that when we are around people we don't act like animals; we want to be presentable.


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