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Dialogue is Action

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Professors? Really?  

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aplitstudent123
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@savhoisington I agree. I have struggled coming up with a question as you said that is worthy enough to ask a professor. I'm still unsure if those questions are meant to be long with my ideas in it and then a question posed at the end? Or if it is meant to be a simple question that the professor is able to elaborate on a lot which will help my understanding. The End of Theory stuff is very complex, so it is hard for me to come up with. avery detailed question when I am still trying to understand it all myself.


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wildsalmon
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@aplitstudent123 It's very much like the forum posts on here, it's difficult for me to write something unless I have a fully fleshed out thing I want to say. Oftentimes I want to ask a professor something, but I second-guess because it's incomplete or too simple. Though, since it is a lot like these forums, I guess conveying an idea at all is the necessary step. It's a bit daunting to have the professor potentially ridicule me, but that's the risk you run, I suppose.


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Nicole
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@savhoisington I think any question that helps you understand the literary theories is worthy of asking the professors. Whether it seems insightful or not, if it adds to your understanding, there is value in that because it is helping you learn. Plus, asking a question that you aren't sure is insightful enough can't harm anything, but refraining from asking anything could potentially be harmful because you may never have another opportunity to get an answer to the question you had.


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username27
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@Nicole - This is a very insightful way to look at this. Like some teachers say, no question is stupid if you have put some thought into it. I think that if someone is thoughtful about their question and is looking to expand their understanding about the subject, it should be answered the same way as any other question. People shouldn't feel bad if their question isn't as complex as others as long it contributes to their understanding of the theory.


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looneylibra
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While I have been using the ask the professor forums and getting responses from them, the one thing I struggle with is finding questions that really go in depth into their expertise.  If anyone had any tips on how they develop their questions to the professors to get more out of those questions I would appreciate it. 


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aplitstudent123
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@nicole This was super helpful to me! I haven't asked a question really since the beginning of our class started so i think this time or next time I will ask a question! I think even if it is more simplistic than I would like, the answer will help me reach a better understanding.


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xwing37
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@username27, I agree, I feel like we talk about so many concepts that are so deep and it's hard to ask a singular question about them. I normally have so many questions just because there's so many different interpretations and ways you can go with these different theories. So I too have struggled with condensing my thoughts into one question, or just picking one of my questions to ask.


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octavia
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@username27 This is a great point to make. I think that a lot of the time in discussion based classes, people feel anxious about posting questions and other inquiries when everyone can see them. Now, there are professors answering these questions, which may heighten this anxiety. But, no question is a stupid one, and any question at all can help someone further their knowledge into the theory. A question can lead to many different pathways, and these pathways can lead to so many possibilities for learning and growth, no matter which one you choose.


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wildsalmon
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@octavia I like this approach to the questions, and I'd like to add my own idea. At least in this class, there's 3 easy ways to ask questions: class discussions, these forums, and professor forums. My way of doing things has always been that once I think of an idea, I bring it to the class discussion, to which Chisnell responds with varying degrees of vagueness. That really helps me ask a better question or bring a stronger idea to these forums, which gets tossed around a bit, sometimes. Finally, the grand concept gets thrown at the professor, to sort of test my whole idea. I think making sure you know the right place to ask your questions is the most important thing, because that growth that was mentioned really benefits from being directed at the right people.


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FRANKLIN
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This is a cool opportunity for us to inquire on anything we want to know regarding the professor or their work. I admired Carol Gillian for her work and I was inspired by her video where she explains the importance of women choosing based off of their needs and wants, rather than basing it on others. Therefore, I asked her why she believes that people should frequently base their decisions on others?


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abuzz
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@salmon My favorite part of the professor question opportunities are the fact that we are able to hear from them directly. This gives us their exact view without question that there are any outside sources manipulating it. This holds true for asking anyone about another's opinion. And yes, I know that these are not the real professors but the people who are answering our questions have devoted their time and studies to embodying the professors, and I feel that this is very beneficial to better understand their works, opinions, and any other lingering thoughts we may have about them.


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username27
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@abuzz - I love this aspect of the ask the professor forums as well. The fact that we can get an individualized and specific answer to our questions in order to help move our thinking about these tough subjects forward is so helpful. I feel like overall these forums have helped me gain a better understanding about the theories we are learning about. I almost wish we could ask more than one question as I often find myself feeling pressured to pin point the area that I have the most questions about. It seems that which each theory, I am thinking about more and more questions to ask.


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octavia
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@username27 With the ask the professor forums, I've also found that I gain more knowledge from them compared to a lot of the other activities. The fact that we really have to ask a question about the topic materials without seeing anyone else's questions first force us to come up with an original idea and really work our brains. 


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Anonymous Parrot
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@octavia That's an interesting take. I feel like we get a good glimpse of the professors thinking with the numerous papers written about them so I feel like asking the professor forums doesn't add crazy value to our learning of a literary theory. I would rather just spend more time discussing the theory rather than asking. But that's just me....


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wildsalmon
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@abuzz I agree, it's definitely much easier to understand something when given ideas from someone who really knows what they're talking about. However, these forums are different in a way that makes it much better for me personally, since each idea is crafted by peers and makes it feel like we're rediscovering (and thus reinforcing) the ideas presented to us. It's more of a "being told" vs. a "finding out" difference, but that all comes down to learning style.


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