Forums

Dialogue is Action

Last Post Update:  Feb 16

Post Credits:

  • 3+ Weeks of Credit: xwing37, Nicole
  • 2 Weeks of Credit:  aplitstudent123, Persephone
  • 1 Week of Credit:  Carla Tortelli, Delphine, abuzz, The Boulder, Nikki, octavia, Snowy Yeti, Gil, Jackson Von, MangoMan, savhoisington

Notifications
Clear all

[Solved] Little Red Riding Hood

Page 8 / 11

MangoMan
(@mangoman)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Veteran
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 120
 

@xwing37 I think that this topic is so interesting and I love coming back to it each weak.  Again a good point is made, a story that is as misogynistic as little red riding hood has been warped over many years and is now a lesson to children about not talking to strangers.  Or the other way to look at it is the opposite way, and how society has come to view this as a sexist story from a life lesson to kids.


ReplyQuote
TheBoulder
(@theboulder)
Gnome AP Lit 2021
Topics
Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 72
 

@xwing37 I feel in our culture we value tradition and older stories even if they are problematic, and tend to brush it off as "it was the time", but it still has such an impact! I think if the story was told from the wolf's view it would expose the creepiness and create more conversations than what has already been imbedded into our society. I love listening to older songs but I have to skip so many because I realize how messed up they are. I think with stories we have to do the same thing, reevaluate what is being told and adapt it as we grow as a society. 


ReplyQuote
ahayo
(@alechayosh07)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Posts
Topics
Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 113
 

@xwing37 Referencing the part where you mentioned it being "outrageous" when you try to explain this observation to others. Often I find myself telling my mom news headlines that I will read in the morning and she will respond with "stop that" or "I don't want to hear that" and I kinda relate it to explaining this side of the tale to her. I feel like when explaining this idea to adults or others they reject it because it might make them uncomfortable and they just don't like taking happy things and turning them dark. 


ReplyQuote
MSAR
 MSAR
(@msar)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Posts
Topics
Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 101
 

@savhoisington I do agree with your thinking. And that is what I didn't get at with my previous post. There is never a definite side or answer to this topic. This inquires us to think more than our western society has allowed us to think from. Over here its mostly either good or bad. So our thinking doesn't allow us to see the good or bad or possibly even other kind of stuff like the agreeable areas of both characters.


ReplyQuote
Madams43
(@madams43)
Gnome AP Lit 2021
Topics
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 87
 

@username27

Right, and that "Don't be a victim" narrative only silences those that are victims, not to mention portrays to young impressionable girls that they can't do, say, or even wear certain things because they would be perpetuating the idea that it makes them easy targets. 


ReplyQuote
Madams43
(@madams43)
Gnome AP Lit 2021
Topics
Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 87
 

I really enjoy coming back to this forum each week and seeing that we've further developed and analyzed this story that seems to have many, many layers. The story of little red toys with the idea of predation of men over vulnerable women, young girls being taught to not be a victim rather than "wolves" being taught to not prey on their innocence, and even the stereotype that all "wolves" are dangerous predators that have to be strong and masculine all the time without allowing themselves to feel their emotions. 


ReplyQuote
Carla Tortelli
(@carlatortelli)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 124
 

@madams43 I completely agree with you. These false standards go both ways in this story and many other stories as you stated. Its the same old tale, boys are meant to be seen as masculine and girls feminine. I'm so very glad we as people are starting to fight that statement, as it is VERY outdated. Hollywood I would say is slowing following the fight as well. But this "standard" runs both ways and always has. Its unfair to grow up watching and reading these things that make it seem like we have a given path to follow. Growing up with people in this mindset only adds to that pressure. 


ReplyQuote
Carla Tortelli
(@carlatortelli)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 124
 

@snowyyeti This is story is pretty easy for us to understand being as though we have been exposed to change. I feel as though our generation has been exposed to more movements and change then most others. In this sense she might not want to take in the fact that not only little red riding hood but many others have a sort of screwed up view. Maybe that adult grew up with that boy vs girl mentality without realizing it and feels uncomfortable when that mentality she grew up with might be wrong. I really don't know if that makes sense but I hope you can take something from it!  


ReplyQuote
Carla Tortelli
(@carlatortelli)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 124
 

@alechayosh07 Many are opposed to these thoughts because they are basically taboo in society. They were told that this kind of thinking or those kinds of ideas were meant to stay in their corner. I like that we (most of our generation) can listen to these ideas, process them, and pick them apart before we flat out reject it. The fact that we are slowly bringing these ideas to light show our or maybe even societies process when it come to these muzzled ideas/thoughts. Its hard to accept the opposite to what you were taught but we still listen with open ears.


ReplyQuote
Delphine
(@delphine)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Veteran
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 135
 

@xwing37 This is a very new idea that I think our world is starting to move towards. It has been mentioned a lot in this thread, but the idea of blaming the victim rather than the perpetrator is a common thing in children's stories. I agree with you that we should definitely as a society be teaching children not to grow up and morph into these bad people, but unfortunately, we live in a broken society where no matter what, there will always be bad people raising more children to become "bad people".  How can we wrestle with the reality of this idea? Do we continue to make attempts to get rid of the bad, even though we know it's virtually impossible? Or should we continue to warn children of the dangers that ultimately surround them in order to protect them by spreading fear?


ReplyQuote
MSAR
 MSAR
(@msar)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Posts
Topics
Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 101
 

@madams43 yes all of this is totally correct, but I'd also like to touch on the cunningness of the predators. Their evasiveness to have the victims educated instead of them is quite an accomplishment by them. To pass by unnoticed. Hiding in plain sight. I wonder if there is any story teaching them to do better?


ReplyQuote
Delphine
(@delphine)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Veteran
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 135
 

@msar I think a story with that perspective is definitely a rare but constructive one. I challenge someone to come up with an example of a story teaching predators to do better in an unconventional way? Perhaps that would make more of an impact on them? Or, are predators just destined to be that way for all of their lives? Something to think about...


ReplyQuote
xwing37
(@xwing37)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 178
 

@delphine, I agree, I know I said that kids should be raised to not be bad people, but this seems a little crazy now that I think about it. Instead of teaching kids to not be the victims we should just teach them to know the world they live in. There's always going to be bad people in the world and that will never change. So maybe if we teach kids to know their surroundings and make decisions based off of it. I know that I completely changed my viewpoint from my previous posts, but after some thought I realized it would be crazy to try and rid the world of bad people.


ReplyQuote
SnowyYeti
(@snowyyeti)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 116
 

@xwing37 I did not see your previous post from which you changed your viewpoint, but I agree totally with the point that you just made.  Teaching kids to be wary of their surroundings is essential for them to be prepared for "the real world."  Also the point that you touch on from @delphine that children's stories blame the victim most of the time is an interesting take but when I think about it, it is true.  I wonder if that mindset of blaming the victim gets into the head of child whether they know it or not, and if it does, does it influence their decisions?


ReplyQuote
username27
(@username27)
Bookworm AP Lit 2021
Topics
Posts
Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 115
 

@snowyyeti - I agree with you. To answer your question, I think that it really does impact their decisions. Many of the stories essentially blame the victim or the child and I feel like this blame kind of the negates the whole point of the story. For example with Little Red, the point of the story is to teach kids not to trust strangers, but the whole story kind of blames the victim. I feel like instead of teaching them how to be vary of their surroundings would be more valuable here instead of painting them as the one to blame.


ReplyQuote
Page 8 / 11
Share:

Forum Reminders:

  • Only Substantive Posts earn credit.
  • Five posts/week earn 100% for that week.
  • Deadlines are Fridays at 11:59 pm.
  • Any single week can earn up to 150%:
    • Six posts = 120%
    • Seven posts = 140%
    • Eight posts = 150%
    • Nine posts = 150%, etc.
  • One successful podcast replaces 5 posts.

Substantive Posts:

  • Are usually several thoughtful sentences in length:
    • Demonstrate that reading was done or a concept is understood
      • Might quote text
    • Express a thoughtful idea about that concept/reading
    • May be questions, but if so, also speculations
  • Are constructive and productive to the discussion
  • Are supportive of other members and their ideas
  • May/should challenge/provoke/take risks in thinking