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Dialogue is Action

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Little Red Riding Hood  

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wildsalmon
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@alechayosh07 I like this, and I also think it's important to remember that it goes the other way, where it would be difficult for the people of the past to comprehend our values. It's a two-way foreignness, so we have to keep both our context and their context in check. For example, people then might've had no filter, but we're now also considerably less sexist. It's a really tiny distinction, but I think knowing the difference between "the past is different from us" and "we're different from the past" can really help the understanding of older stories.


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stella
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@xmysterio, I think you made an excellent point about the villains in these stories "craving" for children. I think the "deeper meaning" you were talking about is referring to pedophillia but this had to be changed in order to fit into the context of these stories. To me this seems like a way to teach children about things that they don't yet understand. Although, we learned in class that these stories were first creaed for adult entertainment, which seems strange to me. 


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Nikki
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@octavia I think that this is so interesting and important in the grand scheme of our society. I like to think that in terms of equal treatment of gender we have come pretty far. But thinking about Little Red Riding Hood and how long this story has been told to young children, I'm not so sure. This story has been used to teach children for hundreds of years, so it is clear that some things haven't changed.


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MSAR
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@salmon When you are talking about fixing society itself, that is a big task that cannot be done without the help of the people in it. Doesn't matter on which "side" they are on, coming together is required to fix it. Maybe this issue isn't such a divisive issue as we thought it is. In order to try and fix it we must come together. A side of the problem that doesn't get looked at so often


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xwing37
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@msar, I agree, this is why I feel like it would be nearly impossible to completely fix an issue like this. The world is so divided, especially right now. So in order for everyone to come together I feel like it would take a lot of time due to the years of division that our world has faced in the past. I would be interested to see what would happen if everyone was on one side of a issue and how much would get done.


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xmysterio
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@delphine I think the purpose of inserting these disturbing themes into children's books is to subtly expose them to the harsh reality of society. When we're little kids, we're often lead to believe that the outside world is all fairytales and fantasies. It's things like Little Red Riding Hood that remind you that there were always signs of the dark truths of the world that we weren't seeing as clearly as children.


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Delphine
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@xmysterio This is a good point, in some cases I suppose it does go right over their heads. I just feel like if we're really trying to make them aware of things that could happen to them in their youth, it would be in a more obvious manner.


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FRANKLIN
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@xmysterio When I read stories like this at a young age, I always took away two things. The first was the lesson being taught. For example, in the Boy Who Cried Wolf, the lesson being delivered was to not lie. The second thing I would take away from most stories like that (Hansel and Gretel/Little Red Riding Hood/Etc.) is that the world can be a cruel place. Not all stories have a happy ending or all good people and that is important for young kids to learn so they can manage their expectations and have a better grasp on the reality that they will grow up and see. 

I saw some comment about some fairytales having pedophilia in them and other bad stuff like that. Although I didn't know what that was at a young age, I learned about that stuff from the news as I got older. I think the fairytales we read at a young age should be analyzed for what they're worth and just used to teach valuable lessons through fun little stories.


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ahayo
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@gardella You make a good point, these stories should be looked at for their lessons at a young age but what if those lessons aren't shared? I understand that when told these stories kids might not be able to see through it all but is it worth lying to them? Hiding the truth to society? Because the world we grow up in isn't like all story books and those lessons are important we all can't be shielded from everything. To wrap it up I do agree with you, learning things that are so sickening at a young age is kind of bad but in my life I have always found it better to learn from someone I trust on a topic rather then see it myself. Whether that's through a story or news.


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Nikki
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@curtis this is so important to acknowledge as well!!! This story is often viewed as a naïve child and her wrongdoing in "letting" the wolf get away with certain actions. In reality the wolf is a predator. This is unfortunately similar to what we see often in society in terms of predators and their victims.


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Nikki
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@octavia this is something that's so interesting to me. So many fairy tales just seem a bit off from a child's perspective, and as you grow older you come to realize that it's due to the hidden meanings behind the stories. Another examples I have is the story of Hansel and Gretel. I was really afraid of that story when I was younger, and now I understand why. It was trying to teach me to be cautious in some form.


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Nikki
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@savhoisington Good point! Love the Coraline tie-in as well! It's possible that there is more than one message to Little Red Riding Hood, as there is I'm sure with many stories. The moral is open to interpretation, but it can teach many different lessons for children. Totally agree with it being creepy though!


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octavia
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@alechayosh07 I agree with this. It kind of reminds me of the saying "ignorance is bliss." Sure, we can let children go by living their lives not knowing these lessons, but learning them early on from someone trustworthy is better than seeing them firsthand and not knowing how to react.


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octavia
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@xmysterio This idea of subtly exposing kids to these ideas is very important. I think now that we are analyzing these children's books and realizing that there was more to them than just innocent stories, we are seeing this idea of being subtle and slowly teaching these kids these lessons, but in a hidden manner. We almost don't want to shock them too much by just telling them these dark truths straight up, so we have to slowly hide them in certain things in society for their own good.


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Nikki
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@curtis Yes!! That's exactly what I mean. It is a little disturbing as subject matter for a young children's story, but what do you think would be an appropriate age to teach lessons like these to children? I honestly don't think it's unreasonable to subconsciously plant ideas like these into the heads of children through stories like these.  


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