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Changing of Opinions: When is it necessary?

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bunkymoo
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@nikki I think that keeping your opinion is very important, but changing it when you have new ideas to add is a good thing. I don't think you should change it only for someone's approval though. You have your opinion and they have theirs. Even if they differ, does it really matter? If you change it, you are doing exactly what they want, and then your opinion doesn't make a difference as much anymore.


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savhoisington
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@stella I agree. being open minded can be very powerful in building your own opinions stronger, not just becoming more aware of others or even changing your mind. Seeing other peoples points of views on anything is so powerful. Whether its an essay or a philosophical discussion, or even clothing style, hearing different perspectives will always help you grow. I think our ability to never stop growing is one of the best qualities of being human and if we close ourselves off to others' opinions we hinder that


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savhoisington
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@delphine I definitely agree. Feelings/ emotions towards a topic can severely hinder a persons willingness to be open minded or even allow them to become too open and adopt an opinion for the wrong reasons. It is important for people to stay knowledgable and do the necessary research before arriving at a conclusion. This is much like any decisions, for example many of us are considering colleges at the moment and im sure we will hear many opinions from many people. But, at the end of the day, it is important to be able to take all opinions and advice into account but still trust yourself. I think this goes for opinion generating as well


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SnowyYeti
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@bunkymoo I agree with your points here.  If you feel the need to adopt someone else's opinion to get their approval, that person definitely doesn't seem like someone you should be around.  I think that agreeing to disagree is much better than agreeing for someone to like you 


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Nikki
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@bunkymoo I'm glad you agree! I do have a question though. Are there any circumstances, in your opinion, where differing opinions can prevent a bond? I'm curious, I've heard different people have different thoughts on this.


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xmysterio
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@delphine I feel that these forums are the place I can keep an open mind most. I can read the start of a topic and see the first replies, and agree with everything I'm reading. I feel that this atmosphere is respectful, and I haven't seen any forums here yet that make me want to argue or differ on opinions. Of course, I have had some discussions with other participants who shared a different opinion than mine. However, that is healthy as it promotes an open mind when you hear an opinion that hasn't yet crossed your mind.


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@bunkymoo I totally agree! There is a good medium between having room for your concepts and ideas to grow, versus changing them for someone else's approval. Everyone's values, ideas, and thoughts, make them who they are, changing it to cater to someone else would simply be pointless. In my own life, I've had similar challenges to this idea. In relation to my personal values, ethics, and where I stand in politics, I've considered not taking discussing what I believe, due to the fact that someone else may disagree, and would judge my opinions. 


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Nicole
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@salmon I think this is a really good point. Changing your mind doesn't necessarily mean that you can't keep elements of what you believe. Only taking bits of others' opinions doesn't even necessarily mean you have to change anything at all about what you believe. You can even just keep things in mind when considering a topic while keeping your original beliefs about it. You are still being open-minded while staying firm with your own beliefs, and I think there is a time for all these situations--completely changing your opinion, only changing parts, changing nothing and keeping others' opinions in mind, and simply sticking to your own opinion in general.


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Gil
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This topic made me think of something I started noticing last year, and Mr. Chisnell brought this up in class yesterday. Last year, I noticed that some teachers can be biased sometimes and most students take it in without a thought as though the teacher's interpretation is fact. When we are in elementary school we see teachers as these authority figures, that were almost like God!! While this complete adoration of teachers wears off throughout our school careers, the idea that teachers are teaching you about the world with unbiased truths remains for most students. Yesterday, Mr. Chisnell pointed out that we are not really going to be learning about all there is to know about Derrida, instead we are going to be learning Mr. Chisnell's interpretation of Derrida. Which I thought was interesting and true! I am not saying that teachers are lying to you, just that teacher's have opinions of their own and in order for them to teach they must rely their own ideas sometimes! My point is, when it comes to sources of information and authority figures in our lives, such as teachers or even the internet, we tend to shape our opinions around those without much question.


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ahayo
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@salmon I think that you've done a great job describing essentially in my opinion the answer to this question. There had been a good amount of posts that have come close to an idea that strong and quite agreeable. I find yours to be blunt and just the truth which I like. When reading it I thought of a human body and homeostasis. During the summer you might run the AC inside and when you go outside it's a lot hotter so you sweat to hold a temperature that is comfortable to you, each person being different. This is similar to how each person might react the same way to something new in a topic and add it to theirs without giving up their meaning, or in my example comfortable temperature. 


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bunkymoo
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@nicole this is exactly what i was trying to say earlier! You don’t have to change your opinion if you take in other pieces of information. You can respect those that have different opinions, and then keep yours the same. I am a big believer in not letting other people’s opinions not affect your original opinion about a strong topic. Of course you will maybe change it a tiny bit, but never enough to change your opinion significantly.


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MSAR
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@gil That is a great point you have brought up. This means that almost everything that we have learned and not experienced ourselves is somewhat biased. Does this mean that our own opinions are opinions of others? Obviously this isn't true, but to some extent it is accurate. Our opinions are based off of other's but we add our own little twist to it. What do you respectable people think?


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Gil
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I agree, I think that it is kind of true that we don't really have our own opinions, especially as teenagers. Even if we are "technically" an adult at eighteen, we are still in school learning from our teachers and under our parents' roof; we haven't really experienced the world for ourselves yet. I remember in Mrs. Gogola's AP Government she told us that we do not have our own opinion's, but our parents' opinions-which I agree! Our parents have the greatest impact on our thinking I believe because we have been learning how to live since day one! We actually just watched a short film called Skin in my first hour film studies. I would definitely recommend watching it. Anyways, this short film really demonstrates the impact of parents' beliefs on their children. 

 


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octavia
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@msar I don't think that our opinions are all opinions of others, I just think there are honestly limited ways of thinking in this world that you're bound to have the same opinion as someone else. Sometimes certain opinions are just popularized for certain reasons. What I'm curious about is why. Why are certain opinions more popular than others? This kind of goes along with what is right and wrong and why are they considered right or wrong.


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MangoMan
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@octavia but what makes a popular opinion? I'm thinking of what makes a large group of people turn to something and say, "we are all gonna agree with this" and then why do people disagree?  I think people changing their opinions can stem from other people's not both with agreeing but disagreeing as well.  


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