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Where do we draw the Line?

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stella
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@xmysterio, although I think this is true sometimes, it is hard to say whether or not your understanding of a work can make it easier or harder to draw a line. If you do not understand a work you could still draw a line, it will probably just be wrong. I think that by understanding a piece you will be closer to drawing an accurate line but it may be harder. by acknowledging all of a work you take into consideration many things, not just the surface level, maybe making it harder to draw a line. 


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MangoMan
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@stella  Sometimes knowing little to nothing is the best way to decide when enough is enough.  I mean think about it, the more time you take to listen to the point the person wants to make the more biased you will become.  A raw and unbiased look on something is usually where you'll get your most honest and real response.


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stella
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@mangoman, this is a good point. I think that the more you know about a piece, the more you can overthink about a piece. Over-analyzing small parts of a piece can sometimes lead you to go over the line. 


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abuzz
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@mangoman I get where you are going with this. It is almost like, "ignorance is bliss." The more complex an argument or discussion gets, the harder it will be to draw a line. I feel this way because the magnitude of the conversation will become so large that there will be conversations that keep branching off and growing, and some may never end. This will also lead to more biases, more opinions being formed, and maybe even some alterations of opinions. Is that so bad, though?


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wildsalmon
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@abuzz I think it's just a function of communication, where the brain has to think less to comprehend the massive amount of information it's being bombarded with. If you really think in depth about anything, for example a moral issue, it just complicates and complicates. If you don't leave out things, it's just not possible to move on with your life. That's why lanugage is so effective, because words really can't capture everything so just enough gets omitted to comprehend. However, if you're in a space where you're prepared to go into depth, I don't see why a line is even necessary. If you're ready to go as deep as you can, you can't and probably shouldn't every try to draw a line.


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bunkymoo
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@mangoman I feel the same about the way that you put this. I feel in general that when I don't have any outside knowledge, and its all based on my gut feeling and my opinion, that the bes answers come out. Nobody has yet to counter your argument, so it leads to you having a raw respoinse.


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ahayo
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@mangoman I agree, I find that when I might talk to some friends about something that we already have formed opinions on it always takes a wrong turn and one person will speak their ideas more than others and will eventually get majority on their side. When it comes to the idea of raw content it makes so much more sense when it comes to drawing a line, because there is no line to draw. Everyone is forming and idea at the same time and will come up with different stuff yeah but it will leave the bias out of the discussion. 


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xmysterio
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@salmon You make a good point. Perhaps a line can be drawn when a piece is barely digested, whether it is an inaccurate one or not. Drawing conclusions from a piece you don’t quite understand doesn’t mean you aren’t permitted to your own opinion on it, so in that way you are right about this. 


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octavia
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@mangoman This is true. I feel like the more you know about something, the more complex it gets and the harder it is to draw a line. That's definitely an "ignorance is bliss" idea, and it's so interesting how this can be applied to literature as well.


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savhoisington
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@octavia I like this idea too.

Posted by: @octavia

the more you know about something, the more complex it gets and the harder it is to draw a line

I like this specifically because it reminds me of the idea that everything is connected whether it is obvious or not. Just like how in literature, no author includes any detail just to fill in space. There are millions of working parts in every piece of literature, and that calls for SO much complexity


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abuzz
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@alechayosh07 Ohh this made me think of some questions? Firstly, do you see yourself "drawing lines" more in conversations that you have a fixated opinion on or in conversations that you come into with a blank slate? Thinking about this, are there different "categories," so to speak, of conversations that drawing a line cannot simply be defined with such a diverse cast of discussions?


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wildsalmon
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@xmysterio Well, what I mean to say is that lines only really SHOULD exist if a piece is fully digested. For example, taboos are only taboos if you don't think too deeply about it. Nothing is truly over the line if you're discussing earnestly and deeply, so long as all parties are prepared for such an event. I can't exactly think of any violations if you drop all pretenses, so I feel "the line" is only ever present when people aren't analyzing. 


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Delphine
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@salmon I somewhat agree, however there are some times when a piece may become so disgusting and offensive that we must draw a line, right? Some things are just too offensive to be put down on paper, no matter if we're analyzing them or not...


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looneylibra
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I wouldn't go as far as to say that ALL interpretations or ideas are of value, but most of the time conflicting ideas can help lead to a greater understanding. Obviously ideas connecting a story about fishing or something of simple literature to ideas in the astral realm or aliens and monsters is a bit far fetched in my mind. I think that well thought out ideas even if they aren't in sync can create a greater view and open up conversation to find a collective meaning even with different ideas. Or also lead to building on all different ideas that make sense in connection to the work. That all being said I believe a line is drawn where ideas lose connectivity to the work. Any ideas that have a lot of thought and can make sense with the work are on the passing side of that line. 


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MangoMan
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@curtis Yeah you have a good point, there is a point where the interpretation can be ridiculous or right out offensive.  A separate forum post talks about "the line" and where you cross it, I think this has to do with it as well.  As long as your idea isn't affecting someone else negatively then I think it's a valid one.


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