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Where do we draw the Line?

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savhoisington
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@aplitstudent123 I also like this idea. It makes me think back to Chisnell's interpretation on that halloween reading where it somehow meant that aliens invaded earth?? He asked us if it had merit and many of us said no, but then he asked why. Who is to say it is too outrageous to be possible? I think this is the question we've been wrestling with all year. This interpretation, to me, feels like it was just a quick "what is an unlikely interpretation?" rather than him trying to derive a true interpretation. This likely came with no research and little  deep thinking, so maybe that is where we draw the line, 

Posted by: @xwing37

either when there isn't any evidence to back up an interpretation or if the person lacks knowledge of the piece of literature.

 

 


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abuzz
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@persephone Not extreme at all! I feel like "drawing a line" or "staying inside of a box" is restricting and holds biases. I agree that interpretations and meanings can always uncover more. Now, it seems silly to hold ourselves back after experiencing the discussions of AP Lit because I feel like I never have closure--- a line is never drawn unless it has to be due to our limited class time. But even then, we take what we talked about to the forums so i guess in fact a line isn't actually drawn!


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abuzz
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@a2m0n2 I'll offer you this: what if someone brings up to you the ideas that you "drew a line for?" I guess you have the option to decline discussing further, but too me that seems restricting and a tad arrogant. Like Chisnell said in class, the more people that are added to a conversation, the more ways a meaning can be stretched and developed. I guess in a way once you remove yourself from the discussion you have drawn your line, but are you opposed to following up at a later time after that "line" has been placed?


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abuzz
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@aplitstudent123 I'm having a hard time agreeing with your first thought. Don't you think it's worth the time to inform the person who did not have a clear understanding of the text? Personally, I would encourage them to re-read the text instead of giving up per-say and just drawing a line. I can only imagine that people who better understand pieces are the ones giving the productive, advanced ideas. By giving the person who did not understand the piece another opportunity, you are opening the door for more of those relevant, profound interpretations.  


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xwing37
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@abuzz, I agree, I think it's important to tell people when they are wrong or need to develop a better interpretation of something. This is true in all aspects of life but it also comes into play in this class. If you don't tell someone when they have done something wrong then they will never be able to grow from an educational standpoint or as a person.


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Persephone
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After reading through the replies since I've last been here, I think I have a somewhat better response... I don't believe a line should ever be drawn because it not only invalidates other people opinions, but also limits the possibility of conversation. That being said, I think in certain sensitive subjects a "line" of sorts may be necessary as more of a boundary for individuals. Although, that sort of sensitivity may not be prominent in our discussions considering the nature of the class, so I think that for the most part we should avoid these lines all together.


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octavia
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@xmysterio I hadn't thought about this before, but it's definitely true. Someone who reads a piece only on the surface finds it easier to draw a line. They aren't exposed to the really in depth ideas that cause them to question or intrigue them. A reader who read in depth and can clearly see the themes and subjects present find it harder to draw the line. 


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SnowyYeti
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@persephone i do see where you are coming from with this idea but I do think that lines need to be drawn even in our discussions.  I 100% agree with you that in sensitive topics that lines could be more necessary as boundaries but I think that even in discussions in this class that boundaries could be helpful for fruitful conversations.  I think that if someone has not read a piece of literature, that them contributing to a conversation about it could be counter productive and prevent the conversation from moving forward, or if someone makes a claim that they have no evidence to back that that could also be a place we could draw a line with interpretation. 


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xwing37
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@snowyyeti, I agree that someone not having knowledge of a piece of literature could be counter productive. They could be saying ideas that are completely false and other students may believe these ideas. I also think that a lot of ideas can be credible as long as they are backed up with evidence, but insensitive ideas can be hurtful and aren't beneficial to the discussion at all. So the line should be drawn in some situations.


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ahayo
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@xwing37 I feel the same way. If I was to "draw a line" on a topic without really thinking about it I would feel wronged. I'm in the same position you are where it would be way to hard for me to draw a line on any topic unless it had little to no evidence. If this class has had anything stick to me really good it's that you need to look deeper into some works to find a meaning that has been buried for a reason, and that will always be with me and helps me not draw a line at times.


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MangoMan
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Now this is just my opinion but who really cares when I say that because I can get scolded for expressing it anyway.  I feel like sometimes when a line is drawn it can be looked at so negatively.  People can whine about it not being drawn sooner or that it doesn't meet all the reasons they feel it should, which brings us back to an earlier post here talking about personal preference.  Some people can tolerate things more than others and may not see the need but that then makes them "wrong" because the majority sees the line as a necessity.  What do you all think about this?


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xmysterio
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@octavia Yes precisely. If a book is barely digested by the reader, it is not likely to be interpreted enough in order for a line to be drawn. I'm glad you saw my perspective, as I truly believe that if you really understand a piece-- a line is more likely to be drawn.


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wildsalmon
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@xmysterio Is that really true, though? It seems as if barely digesting is enough to draw a line, just not an accurate one. When you fully and deeply understand a work, that's when drawing a line gets very tricky, with all the subtle complexities riddled throughout. Drawing a solid line is so much harder once you acknowledge all the little contradictions within something. I suppose using a book doesn't make much sense at this point though, it's more about ideas. The "line" too doesn't make much sense, but it's a nebulous idea and seems to come across.


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SnowyYeti
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@mangoman I also think that sometimes when a line is drawn that it can be looked at negatively.  But why would you suppress some peoples opinions???  When I think about this question, "where do we draw the line" I am thinking about it more in this class and our discussions than in the real world but I absolutely think that lines should be drawn because like I have mentioned, if someone has not read a book or has no evidence to back something up, why should they contribute to our conversation? It would just be counterproductive.  


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a2m0e0m2
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@mangoman I completely see where you're coming from on this, and it can really come into any argument. For example, some parents might be fine with their children getting bad grades or not care as much, but I would assume to the majority of parents that is a big deal. Those parents might see the parents who care about the grades as being dramatic and cruel to their children but different parents expect different things from their children just as different humans expect different things from their acquaintances. 


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